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Why Do People Sue Over Their Security Deposit?

Most landlords will require their tenants to give them a security deposit as part of their lease agreement. In theory, the security deposit is just meant to cover costs of any damage a tenant might cause to the apartment aside from normal wear and tear upon the tenant vacating the apartment with any unused money returned to the tenant. Some landlords may attempt to improperly keep the money from the deposit, which can lead to litigation. Here are just a few common reasons people sue over their security deposit: Continue reading “Why Do People Sue Over Their Security Deposit?”

What Should You Do If You Get in a Dispute With Your Landlord

When a tenant gets into a dispute with their landlord, it can seem at first like the landlord holds the upper hand. That said, tenants have legal rights when it comes to their relationship with their landlord, if the Tenant knows how and when to exercise them. Here are four things you should do if you get into a dispute with your landlord: Continue reading “What Should You Do If You Get in a Dispute With Your Landlord”

Fears of Mass Evictions as Moratorium Set to Expire

Tenants and public officials alike fear a wave of mass evictions is coming once New York’s moratorium on evictions expires next month. Governor Andrew Cuomo instituted the moratorium to prevent people from being evicted during the coronavirus quarantine, when a stay-at-home order was still in effect. With many people still out of work due to the coronavirus pandemic, some tenants have been unable to pay rent for the duration of the crisis, and landlords are already preparing to evict non-paying tenants once the moratorium expires in August. Continue reading “Fears of Mass Evictions as Moratorium Set to Expire”

NYC Freezes Rent for Regulated Apartments for One Year

The New York City Rent Guidelines Board has voted to freeze rent on regulated apartments for one year, starting September 2020 and extending to October 2021. The purpose behind the rent freeze is to help residents of regulated apartments to endure through the coronavirus pandemic, as many New York City residents remain out of work. The move has angered advocates for both renters and landlords, who see the vote as a compromise that satisfies no one. Continue reading “NYC Freezes Rent for Regulated Apartments for One Year”

NY Rent Moratorium Extended Through August

In a recently issued executive order, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has extended the state’s moratorium on rent for an additional two months through August 20, 2020. The moratorium, which began in March, suspended all legal action to evict tenants who fail to pay rent while the moratorium is in effect. While landlords have reacted poorly to the extension, tenant advocates are celebrating it as a reprieve from difficult economic circumstances caused by the coronavirus outbreak. Continue reading “NY Rent Moratorium Extended Through August”

Landlords Need to Give Notice Before Giving the Boot

A new law in New York State has changed the rules for landlords, preventing them from simply kicking tenants out of their apartments. Instead, landlords of unregulated apartments must now give thirty days’ notice if they intend to not renew a lease agreement, thus allowing tenants the opportunity to find new lodgings. It also forces them to give thirty days’ notice if they intend to increase the rent by five percent or more. Continue reading “Landlords Need to Give Notice Before Giving the Boot”

The Warranty of Habitability

When you sign a lease to rent an apartment, there are a few basic expectations you probably have about your new residence. One is that you will actually be able to live in the space you’ve rented. While this might seem like a reasonable request, there are many landlords who do not hold up that end of the bargain. Fortunately, the law protects your right to livable conditions, with what is known as the warranty of habitability. Continue reading “The Warranty of Habitability”

Landlord Groups File Lawsuit to Block New Rent Laws

Several groups that represent landlords in New York have sued to block new rent-control measures that were recently signed into law by Governor Andrew Cuomo. The new laws limit landlords’ ability to raise rent on rent-controlled apartments, even after their current tenants leave. This limits landlords’ ability to make money on those apartments, which they argue is an unconstitutional deprivation of their property rights. Continue reading “Landlord Groups File Lawsuit to Block New Rent Laws”

Eliminating Major Capital Improvements

New York State Senator Michael Gianaris and New York State Assemblyman Brian Barnwell have introduced legislation that would do away with Major Capital Improvements (MCI) for apartments in an effort to protect tenants’ rights. According to an article from Crain’s New York Business, the MCI program began in the 1970’s which allowed landlords to make capital improvements to their buildings and pass the costs onto the tenants by raising their rents.
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Understanding Rental Increases

Landlord-tenant disputes can occur for numerous reasons with the most common issues arising due to the non-payment of rent.

According to the New York State Attorney General, the rental units are described as follows:

  • Regulated Housing (rent controlled and rent stabilized);
  • Unregulated Housing (private ownership);
  • Special Housing (mobile homes, residential hotels, lofts); and
  • Government-Financed Housing (section 8, public housing).

Continue reading “Understanding Rental Increases”