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Landlords Need to Give Notice Before Giving the Boot

A new law in New York State has changed the rules for landlords, preventing them from simply kicking tenants out of their apartments. Instead, landlords of unregulated apartments must now give thirty days’ notice if they intend to not renew a lease agreement, thus allowing tenants the opportunity to find new lodgings. It also forces them to give thirty days’ notice if they intend to increase the rent by five percent or more. Continue reading “Landlords Need to Give Notice Before Giving the Boot”

The Warranty of Habitability

When you sign a lease to rent an apartment, there are a few basic expectations you probably have about your new residence. One is that you will actually be able to live in the space you’ve rented. While this might seem like a reasonable request, there are many landlords who do not hold up that end of the bargain. Fortunately, the law protects your right to livable conditions, with what is known as the warranty of habitability. Continue reading “The Warranty of Habitability”

Landlord Groups File Lawsuit to Block New Rent Laws

Several groups that represent landlords in New York have sued to block new rent-control measures that were recently signed into law by Governor Andrew Cuomo. The new laws limit landlords’ ability to raise rent on rent-controlled apartments, even after their current tenants leave. This limits landlords’ ability to make money on those apartments, which they argue is an unconstitutional deprivation of their property rights. Continue reading “Landlord Groups File Lawsuit to Block New Rent Laws”

New York State Passes New Rent Laws

After much opposition, the New York State Legislature recently passed new rent laws that offer more protections to tenants located in New York City.  The underlying goal of the new laws is to maintain affordability and stability in a city which nearly 65 percent of residents are renters. Continue reading “New York State Passes New Rent Laws”

Landlord and Tenant Information Regarding Air Conditioners

Although it may feel like the New York weather skipped the spring season, summer is right around the corner.  And with that being said, people are flocking to the stores to purchase an air conditioner.  When living in a rental apartment, one might be curious as to the landlord/tenant protections of putting in an air conditioner.  Although New York has limited protections surrounding the use of air conditioners, there are some important things to know.

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Brooklyn Apartment Residents Sue for Harassment, Illegal Airbnb Rentals

A group of Brooklyn residents are suing their landlords, claiming they are trying to force them out of their rent-regulated apartments so the landlords can illegally rent out the vacant residences through Airbnb. The New York Daily News reported that the landlords cut off their heat and hot water, constantly harassed them and allowed the units to deteriorate.
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Eliminating Major Capital Improvements

New York State Senator Michael Gianaris and New York State Assemblyman Brian Barnwell have introduced legislation that would do away with Major Capital Improvements (MCI) for apartments in an effort to protect tenants’ rights. According to an article from Crain’s New York Business, the MCI program began in the 1970’s which allowed landlords to make capital improvements to their buildings and pass the costs onto the tenants by raising their rents.
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Understanding Rental Increases

Landlord-tenant disputes can occur for numerous reasons with the most common issues arising due to the non-payment of rent.

According to the New York State Attorney General, the rental units are described as follows:

  • Regulated Housing (rent controlled and rent stabilized);
  • Unregulated Housing (private ownership);
  • Special Housing (mobile homes, residential hotels, lofts); and
  • Government-Financed Housing (section 8, public housing).

Continue reading “Understanding Rental Increases”

Navigating the Termination of Lease and Eviction Process

Eviction Isn’t Easy:
Navigating the Termination of Lease and Eviction Process

 

Evicting a tenant usually isn’t on your everyday “to-do” list. Unfortunately, while renting out space to another individual, conflicts may arise. According to landlordology.com, the top five common reasons for eviction are:

  • Nonpayment of rent;
  • Lease violation(s);
  • Property damage;
  • Illegal or drug-related activity; and
  • Expiration of a lease.

Continue reading “Navigating the Termination of Lease and Eviction Process”