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Five Terms You Should Be Aware of In Your Lease Agreement

A surprising number of people do not pay much attention to their lease agreement before they sign and commit themselves to what is a binding contract. Because of this, a surprising number of tenants (and even some landlords) will find themselves shocked to discover what their lease actually requires from them. Here are five terms you should be familiar with in your lease agreement, in case you get in a dispute with your landlord:

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NY State Legislature Extends Residential Eviction Moratorium

The New York State legislature passed a bill that extends the state’s moratorium on residential evictions until January 15, 2022. The bill extends the pre-existing eviction moratorium, which has been in effect since March, 2020. The extension comes as the moratorium expired on Tuesday night August 31, 2021, which could have resulted in thousands of New Yorkers being evicted and potentially homeless. Continue reading “NY State Legislature Extends Residential Eviction Moratorium”

Federal Eviction Moratorium Extended, But Problems Mount

The Biden Administration announced a new federal eviction moratorium. This moratorium will last until October 3, 2021.  This moratorium will protect many tenants from eviction until its expiration.  However, the new moratorium does not protect everyone, and concerns continue to mount about the high risk of potential homelessness once the moratorium finally expires. Continue reading “Federal Eviction Moratorium Extended, But Problems Mount”

Five Common Reasons for Constructive Eviction

A “constructive eviction” is the legal term for someone being chased out of their rented property due to inhospitable or inhabitable conditions. In other words, when someone has been subjected to a constructive eviction, they have effectively been kicked out of their home because it is no longer possible to live there in safety or comfort. Here are five of the most common reasons for constructive evictions: Continue reading “Five Common Reasons for Constructive Eviction”

Why Do People Sue Over Their Security Deposit?

Most landlords will require their tenants to give them a security deposit as part of their lease agreement. In theory, the security deposit is just meant to cover costs of any damage a tenant might cause to the apartment aside from normal wear and tear upon the tenant vacating the apartment with any unused money returned to the tenant. Some landlords may attempt to improperly keep the money from the deposit, which can lead to litigation. Here are just a few common reasons people sue over their security deposit: Continue reading “Why Do People Sue Over Their Security Deposit?”

What Should You Do If You Get in a Dispute With Your Landlord

When a tenant gets into a dispute with their landlord, it can seem at first like the landlord holds the upper hand. That said, tenants have legal rights when it comes to their relationship with their landlord, if the Tenant knows how and when to exercise them. Here are four things you should do if you get into a dispute with your landlord: Continue reading “What Should You Do If You Get in a Dispute With Your Landlord”

Federal Eviction Moratorium Extended Until December 31, 2020

Citing concerns about the effects that widespread evictions might have on the spread of the coronavirus, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has extended the federal eviction moratorium until December 31, 2020. In effect, this means that all evictions across the country, including in New York, must halt until the end of the year. However, this extension is not automatic, and tenants will need to advocate for themselves to avoid being evicted from their homes. Continue reading “Federal Eviction Moratorium Extended Until December 31, 2020”

Fears of Mass Evictions as Moratorium Set to Expire

Tenants and public officials alike fear a wave of mass evictions is coming once New York’s moratorium on evictions expires next month. Governor Andrew Cuomo instituted the moratorium to prevent people from being evicted during the coronavirus quarantine, when a stay-at-home order was still in effect. With many people still out of work due to the coronavirus pandemic, some tenants have been unable to pay rent for the duration of the crisis, and landlords are already preparing to evict non-paying tenants once the moratorium expires in August. Continue reading “Fears of Mass Evictions as Moratorium Set to Expire”

NYC Freezes Rent for Regulated Apartments for One Year

The New York City Rent Guidelines Board has voted to freeze rent on regulated apartments for one year, starting September 2020 and extending to October 2021. The purpose behind the rent freeze is to help residents of regulated apartments to endure through the coronavirus pandemic, as many New York City residents remain out of work. The move has angered advocates for both renters and landlords, who see the vote as a compromise that satisfies no one. Continue reading “NYC Freezes Rent for Regulated Apartments for One Year”

NY Rent Moratorium Extended Through August

In a recently issued executive order, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has extended the state’s moratorium on rent for an additional two months through August 20, 2020. The moratorium, which began in March, suspended all legal action to evict tenants who fail to pay rent while the moratorium is in effect. While landlords have reacted poorly to the extension, tenant advocates are celebrating it as a reprieve from difficult economic circumstances caused by the coronavirus outbreak. Continue reading “NY Rent Moratorium Extended Through August”